Great news – 2014.11.25

This arrived in my virtual inbox at my Etsy shop – feedback left by the purchaser of my most recent custom pet portrait.  I’m touched and thrilled by her comments.

Toby - finishedThis is an extraordinary work of art, the perfect tribute to the life of our beloved canine companion, Toby. Terry is a gifted artist and quilter, and she is also compassionate and empathetic. She wanted the quilt to be perfect for us, and it is. Terry has an uncanny knack–a genius–for capturing the life and spirit of a creature and beautifully rendering this vibrant life force in fabric. Our dog, Toby, is so alive on the quilt, I almost expect him to leap from the center to plop on my lap with a giant lick. The quilt is truly magical.

 

And this arrived in my physical mailbox this afternoon.   A complimentary copy of the Winter 2015 issue of Art Quilting Studio magazine.  It will be on newsstands in a few days, and one of my self-portrait quilts is on pages 126 and 127.

ArtQuiltingStudioWinter2015  ArtQuiltingStudioWinter2015pp126-7

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On my design wall – 2014.11.19

I’m working on some pillow covers for our living room.  These are the colors I’m using.  I’m quilting them with black thread, and will bind them with black.  I plan to make several pillows in these colors, with a variety of geometric patterns.

DSCN4175

 

Thanks for stopping by.  Today, I’m linking up with these blogs – click on the links below, where you’ll find many other creative projects to inspire you.

WIP Wednesday at Freshly Pieced     Esther’s Blog  Sew Fresh Quilts

 

P.S.  Don’t forget to pop over to Blogathon Canada, a week-long blog hop of Canadian quilting blogs, sponsored by Sew Sisters Quilt Shop.  If you follow along, You’ll get to visit and meet some amazing Canadian quilting bloggers – and there are giveaways to enter every day!blogathon_badge_2014T

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Welcome Blogathon Canada visitors!

I’m delighted to be participating in the third Blogathon Canada, a week-long blog hop of Canadian quilting blogs, sponsored by Sew Sisters Quilt Shop.  If you follow along, You’ll get to visit and meet some amazing Canadian quilting bloggers – and there are giveaways to enter!blogathon_badge_2014

The first stop is Beautiful British Columbia, and the BC hosts are Stacey of Stacey in Stitches, and Jessica at Momiji Studio.   Make sure you visit both of their blogs, and enter their giveaways.  And they will introduce you to many more BC quilters.

If you’re new to my blog, here’s some information about me.  I’ve been hooked on quilting since 1998.  I consider myself primarily an art quilter, but I’m also an enthusiastic member of the Vancouver Modern Quilt Guild, and I appreciate all styles of quilting.

I don’t have any new projects to show today (as my machine is getting it’s annual checkup), but here are a few of my recent projects.

 

Don’t forget to check out all the other BC quilters listed on Stacey and Jessica’s blogs, and check back with Sew Sisters for the rest of the week, as they travel across Canada.

 

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Something just for me! – 2014.11.12

I can’t remember the last time I made something for our home. I’m usually quilting for a show or a challenge, or for a custom order.  Or even just to add to the inventory in my Etsy shop.  But this table runner was made specifically for our new dining table.

A few months ago I attended a VMQG sponsored workshop with Marianne Haak.  Marianne demonstrated her QAYG techniques, and we all practiced making blocks that were about 18 x 18 inches.  I made 3 blocks – with no specific plans for them.

QAYG workshop  QAYG blocks

When we recently bought a new dining room table with a dark gray glass top, it cried out for a bright and colorful table runner, and I remembered my QAYG blocks.  I cut 2 of them down to about 12 inches wide, and referring to Marianne’s excellent tutorials, I added a section to one block, then joined the various sections together.   The table runner is 69 inches long by 12 inches wide.  In the left photo below, you can see it on the table.  In the right photo, you can see it on my design wall – the front and the back.

QAYG table runner on table 

 

Thanks for stopping by.  Today, I’m linking up with these blogs – click on the links below, where you’ll find many other creative projects to inspire you.

WIP Wednesday at Freshly Pieced     Esther’s Blog  Sew Fresh Quilts

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Off my design wall – a project start to finish and a tutorial – 2014.11.08

I usually show my progress on a quilt through several posts, but I didn’t blog about this one because it was going to be juried.  It’s now been accepted for the exhibition, so I’ll show my entire process – start to finish – in one post.

It’s for a new Fibre Art Network exhibition, titled ‘Canadiana’.  All pieces must be 18 inches wide, and the length can be anywhere from 24 to 54 inches.

original photoI had initially thought I would make another Vancouver cityscape, but the 18 inch width was feeling restrictive.  Then I remembered a photo I took a couple of years ago of the Lions Gate Bridge as we walked along the Stanley Park seawall.  It fits the vertical format much better than a cityscape.  I love the teal tones of the bridge, and wanted to use realistic colors for that.  But I decided to make the sky a warmer lavender-blue shade for better contrast.

I won’t make you read all the way to the bottom to see the finished quilt – here it is.  (But if you’re interested in how I made my full size pattern and how I constructed the quilt, continue reading.)

Aske_Terry_An_Air_of_Elegance

As usual, I used Picasa to edit the photo.  I cropped it, lightened it, then used the ‘pencil sketch’ effect to get a line drawing.  I printed that version of the photo on letter size paper and used a pencil to fill in a few missing details.

I like to have a full-size pattern and a full-size mirror image pattern.  I use the full-size pattern to position the various pieces, and I use the mirror image to trace pattern pieces onto freezer paper and/or paper-backed fusible web.  I’ve found a nifty way to get both patterns. I photocopy my line drawing onto a product called Fun-dation. It’s a semi-transparent foundation material that comes in letter size sheets and can be run through a printer.  Because it’s semi-transparent, you can see the mirror image on the reverse side of the sheet.  The image can be photocopied and enlarged from either side of the foundation sheet.  (The reverse side is a little fainter, so the printer may need to be set to a darker setting.)  My printer can take 11 x 17 inch paper so for this pattern I enlarged my images by 400% and printed the full-size pattern on 4 pieces of paper.

pencil sketch effect      selecting fabrics

I used a similar process to what I used for ‘Swoop’ – my quilt of the Skybridge.  (And it was so easy to look back on my blog post and read about my process – I didn’t have to wrack my brains to remember what I did and why.)  As with ‘Swoop’, the larger parts were constructed from freezer paper templates with edges folded under and the smaller parts were fused raw edge appliqué.

building crossbracesThe fused units were constructed on parchment paper laid over the pattern. When they were complete, I just peeled the fused unit off the parchment paper and pinned it on the design wall.  Here is the cross brace section under construction.

I needed to make sure I had enough value differences  to make the bridge look three-dimensional and solid.  So I auditioned a lot of teal fabrics before starting construction.

checking value differences

I made the sky background and quilted it before I added the bridge.  I positioned and fused the bridge components, then straight stitched the edges.

backupground quilted    most units constructed and pinned

 

The large main cables are fussy cut from a great striped fabric – the white-gray-black stripes look like the cables are lit from above by the sun.  The vertical suspending cables were made from 2 strands of white embroidery thread couched in place.
auditioning cable fabric

 

Title and artist’s statement – I usually think about this while making the quilt and jot down descriptive words and phrases as they occur to me. I also did some internet research about the history of the bridge. Several sites used the words elegant and graceful to describe the bridge and that really resonated with me. On the day of the deadline for entry I still hadn’t decided on a title.  As I was writing the artist’s statement, editing my description down to 50 words, I used the phrase ‘air of elegance’ and decided that would be my title.

The Lions Gate Bridge has been an iconic landmark of Vancouver BC since 1938.   Its striking teal colour and slender metal structural towers lend it an air of elegance. Here the bridge soars over the seawall in Stanley Park, then spans the First Narrows of the Burrard Inlet.

 

Thanks for stopping by.  Today, I’m linking up with these blogs – click on the links below, where you’ll find many other creative and inspirational projects.

   Creations by Nina-Marie   Confessions of a Fabric Addict

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